Silk Carpets’ Origins

The emergence of silk carpet weaving and the use of silk strings made it possible to elevate the craft to a higher quality and aesthetic level. Silk is extracted from the silkworm’s casing, which is formed during its transformation into a pupa and then into a butterfly. Before definite development, the coverings are dried and the hatchlings die. From six to eight kilograms of covers, about one kilogram of silk strings are obtained through special treatment, which allows the thickness of carpet weaving to be increased to up to 2,000,000 bunches per square meter. It should be noted that large bunch thickness does not imply superior carpet qualities; it is necessary to obtain more intricate saturated trims. Making silk carpets is a lengthy and exhausting process. This explains why they are incurring higher costs. Silk is widely used in carpet weaving in China, Turkey, India, and Persia (Iran).

Chinese silk carpets
China, as the origin of silk, has developed ways for preparing and coloring it. Chinese silk carpets were primarily story-driven, depicting scenes of chase, public activity, legendary scenarios with mythological monsters, and so on. Furthermore, the usage of local plant colors gave them a unique resonance. Late carpets are known for their abundance of colors and the power of flower designs. They are influenced by the conventions of Persian carpet weaving as a result of the Great Silk Road.

The production of Chinese carpets has expanded in recent years. Chinese manufacturers use, in addition to their own, traditional Persian and Turkish ornamentalism, demonstrating a high level of creativity and craftsmanship. Unfortunately, there are also low-quality fakes created using a self-loader approach using rayon.

Turkish Silk Carpets
Antique specimens of Turkish carpets were unparalleled; they were made of expensive local silk and frequently featured gold strings weaved into them. Hereke silk carpets were made throughout the nineteenth century, coinciding with the expansion of silk manufactures. A splendid manufactory was erected in 1844, while the Court was active in Istanbul. Carpets were used as gifts for distinguished outsiders. The fall of the Ottoman Empire was mirrored in the aesthetic creations of the time. After a lengthy era of success, the Istanbul Manufactory was destroyed by fire in 1878. In 1880, an abundance of silkworms led to the decline of the adjacent carpet weaving industry. The recovery of the customs of making silk Turkish carpets began in the 1930s. Here carpets are now known for their excellent structure and sensitive, perfect work. They are made with high-quality Bursa silk.

Indian Silk Carpets
The Safavid influence is visible in old Indian silk carpets. It can be perceived in ornamentalism and drawing organization since the seventeenth century. In Indian carpets, there is a lack of delineation of nature, foliage, and, particularly, blooms. Towards the beginning of the seventeenth century, Emperor Jahangir trained the well-known ace of small scale, Mansur, to depict the various blossoms of Kashmir to serve as models for carpet-creators, which were blossoms dissipated over the field, looking like valuable stones, connected by shoots and stems, forming a rich example. Similarly, traditional Indian silk carpets depict images of pursuit in untamed woods where predators abound, birds with vivid plumage ripple, and huge elephants roam; this contradicts the foundation of itemized, multi-shaded typical motifs.

Indian Silk Carpets
The impact of small-scale craftsmanship is easily sensed in these rugs, which have an abundance of boosting components. Many carpets from India are produced using standard Persian patterns and have acceptable quality characteristics. This is especially true for Kashmiri silk carpets, which are made from high-quality local silk and dyed with extremely vibrant colors. Kashmiri silk carpets come in two varieties: the highest bunch thickness (up to 1.5 million bunches per square meter) and the standard, which uses cotton strings for the weft twist. Currently, Kashmir is the principal district for the manufacture of Indian silk carpet. With their abundance of boosting components, these rugs easily demonstrate the impact of smaller-than-normal craftsmanship. Many carpets from India are woven with traditional Persian patterns and have high-quality characteristics.

This is especially true for Kashmiri silk carpets, which are made from high-quality local silk and dyed with vibrant colors. Kashmiri silk carpets come in two varieties: the most notable bunch thickness (up to 1.5 million bunches per square meter) and the standard, which uses cotton strings for the weft twist. Kashmir is currently the primary location for the production of Indian silk carpets. The impact of small-scale workmanship is easily recognized in these rugs, which feature a plethora of decorative components. Many carpets from India are made with a standard Persian pattern and have high-quality characteristics. This is especially true for Kashmiri silk carpets, which are made from high-quality local silk and dyed with extremely durable colors. Kashmiri silk carpets are available in two thicknesses: the thickest (up to 1.5 million bunches per square meter) and the standard, which uses cotton strings for the weft.

Currently, Kashmir is the primary location for the manufacture of Indian silk carpets. Nonetheless, they have respectable quality characteristics. This is especially true for Kashmiri silk carpets, which are made from high-quality local silk and dyed with extremely vibrant colors. Kashmiri silk carpets come in two varieties: the highest bunch thickness (up to 1.5 million bunches per square meter) and the standard, which uses cotton strings for the weft twist. Currently, Kashmir is the primary district for the assembly of Indian silk carpets. Regardless, their quality attributes are tolerable. This is especially true for Kashmiri silk carpets, which are made from high-quality local silk and dyed with extremely vibrant colors. Kashmiri silk carpets are available in two thicknesses: the thickest (up to 1.5 million bunches per square meter) and the standard, which uses cotton strings for the weft. Currently, Kashmir is the primary location for the assembly of Indian silk carpets.

Persian Silk Carpets
Silk carpets are woven across Iran, with major centers in Tabriz, Tehran, Isfahan, Kashan, and Qom. Tabriz carpets are known for their faultless and meticulous weaving, which comes in both balanced and hilter-kilter ties. The materials used (silk and colors) are of exceedingly high quality. When in doubt, the decoration is vegetal and constructed on a light foundation; it could be with or without a focal emblem (“Foshan”).

Isfahan is the old capital of the Safavids, and it is still the national pride of the country today, referring to a genuine workmanship workshop, a genuine house of craftsmanship, a sort of eastern Florence, where for a long time the ability to discover and create intriguing imaginative ideas about all types of workmanship and handily use them in design was developed particularly hand-made carpet weaving. Isfahan silk carpets are produced by Persian craftsmanship norms, including emblems, nurseries, and trees of life. Furthermore, there is a neighborhood arrangement known as “Esumi,” which is a delicate and adaptive plant shoot that connects little plot themes with leaves and flowers.

Kashan produces minor quantities of silk rugs. The customary ornamentation is distinguished by unique plot themes in the carpet’s central emblem. Generally, the “Herati” theme is used on the outskirts. Green, water, blue, and blue are common colors used in these carpets for homes.

Silk carpets in Dubai from Qom received new impetus for growth at the turn of the twentieth century, gaining enormous ground in a short period and reaching its pinnacle. It was organized by enterprising Kashan representatives and supported by Shah Reza Pahlavi. Nearby carpet artisans use the distinctive preparation of a few traditional models in the production of silk carpets, preferring to replicate the simple plant motifs of the Safavid period as a foundation. The Qum silk carpet is a cheerful orchestra composed of images of stems, branches, leaves, and palmettes with delicate vaporous patterns. Carpets are also created here to meet the interests of buyers, with designs and artistic elements based on well-known works from Tabriz and Isfahan.

Tehran is a sort of center research facility where the essential results of creative quests in the field of carpet weaving throughout Iran are gathered, worked out, and idealized. Silk carpets from Tehran are made of the highest quality materials and are manufactured by renowned carpet producers who are known for their meticulous, delicate, and thick weaving. The “lul baft” approach is used to achieve the largest thickness in Tehran carpets, which are distinguished by the use of a unique resonance of red with lilac color.

Silk Carpets’ Origins